UK & EEA Immigration Lawyer & Advocate

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Тема: Новости UK & EEA Immigration Law от Legal Centre, 07791145923

  1. #151
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    02 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> Luxembourg court to be asked if the UK can cancel Brexit

    Last week the Scottish Court of Session agreed to make a reference to the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg to determine whether the UK’s notice that it is leaving the EU under Article 50 can be cancelled.

    The case, formally known as Wightman & Others v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, has a fairly tortuous procedural history. Initially permission to proceed with the case was refused. This was overturned on appeal. The case proceeded but was refused on its merits by the Outer House (the Scottish equivalent of the High Court). This has now been overturned on appeal to the Inner House (the Scottish equivalent of the Court of Appeal).
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  2. #152
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    03 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> Switching from a visitor visa into a partner’s route visa – further insight

    Ideally, the Entry Clearance is required, yet there are certain circumstances the applicant may need to lodge an in-country application. Should it be the case, the appendix EX1 is usually relevant. Often the references have to be made, for example, to the Baroness Hale in Chikwamba at the Para 8, and the Chen case at the Para 39. It may also be helpful to further rely upon the case of ZH (Tanzania).

    This is a complex and evolving area, so the expert advice, like ours, is needed in most cases.

    >>> Can a Tier 2 (ICT) dependent switch in-country into the Tier 2 (General) category ?

    Apparently, the answer is “NO”, under the Para 245HD.(b), which clearly prevents such an applicant from switching in-country.

    >>> Are you a few days/weeks short for a qualifying time for Settlement ?

    If you fall outside the 28 day period, you can apply for an extension and then vary the application when the requirements are met.
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  3. #153
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    05 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> The UK Immigration system (some brave prognosis) after the Brexit

    It is just the general view on how the UK immigration system MAY look like after the Brexit:

    1) EU free movement will come to an end
    2) There will be a level playing field between EU and non-EU workers
    3) Highly skilled workers will be prioritised
    4) The new immigration system is likely to be just an amended version of the current UK Immigration Rules
    5) The Tier 2 cap is likely to be scrapped
    6) Access to Tier 2 will be widened for employers and employees
    7) No separate visa route for low skilled work
    8) The Tier 5 Youth Mobility Scheme will be extended
    9) UK nationals will have to apply online before visiting the continent

    And…

    10) All of the above may be ditched depending on the trade deal offered

    >>> You are a non-EEA national with a British spouse in the prison. Is all lost ?

    Not necessarily. Although the UK BA tend to INITALLY refuse such applications. If so, the further option is to lodge an appeal (provided the Appellant otherwise satisfies the Rules), relying upon TZ (Pakistan) and PG (India).

    >>> Tier 4 Student application – what can be done, if there is “gap” between the course start date (in-country) applications

    There may be the case when a student completes one course and his current leave to remain expires BEFORE this new course is about to start say, in a couple of months’ time. The easiest option, is, of course, to leave the UK and re-apply from the applicant’s country of habitual residence.

    Yet there are cases when return home of undesirable. In this case and in order to “bridge the gap” the applicant may lodge a human rights application in-country and then, when it will be just 28 days before the start of the new course, vary his/her human rights application for the Tier 4 Student one.

    This is a complex area and the legal assistance from the immigration advocates like the Legal Centre (www.legalcentre.org) is strongly advisable

    >>> Can a visitor lodge an Entry Clearance application for a different immigration category, while in the UK ?

    Apparently, the answer is “No”, in line with the Para 28 of the Immigration Rules:

    “An applicant for an entry clearance must be outside the United Kingdom and Islands at the time of the application”.

    >>> Visitor visa refused ? Can one lodge an appeal ?

    Yes and No. Usually, there is no right of the appeal upon the refusal of the Visitor Visa application. At the same time, a Judicial Review claim can be lodged to the relevant court which, is successful, may result in the visitor visa being granted.

    >>> Settlement applications process in the USA – a major change

    Effective from the 10th September 2018.

    It should be noted that moving forward, Settlement applications submitted in the USA should still be sent directly to Sheffield, unless the PAC and the Settlement Premium Service is being used ($1900, in addition to the filing fee). The PAC scans and emails to Sheffield when using this service.

    To clarify the BCG in NY is no longer processing any applications, they are all being processed in Sheffield or Croydon.

    >>> No second chance for work visa applicants if sponsoring company loses licence: https://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2018/2103.html

    In the case of Pathan & Anor v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA 2103 the Court of Appeal reminds us, once again, of the rigidity and inflexibility of the Points Based System. It is also a good reminder of the purpose and policy behind the Tier 2 visa route.

    Briefly, if the UK BA revokes the Tier 2 Sponsorship license, the UK BA may not need to inform the Tier 2 migrants about it AND the Tier 2 migrants may not expect any grace from the UK BA to have (any) chance to find a new Tier 2 sponsor in-country.
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  4. #154
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    06 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> UK Immigration Rues in one place: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigrat...on-rules-index

    Immigration Rules: Index

    The rules are divided into different documents. The index page will help you find the part you need.

    Not for the light hearted ©

    >>> IELTS Test and the hearing or listening difficulties : https://www.ielts.org/book-a-test/sp...g-difficulties

    >>> Guidance on how English language requirements are assessed for Tiers 1 and 2 of the points-based system: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...glish-language
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  5. #155
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    08 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> Is switching from the Tier 2(ICT) into the Tier 2(General) possible without a 12 month cooling off period ?

    Apparently, the answer may be “Yes”. If the migrant is earning in excess of the (currently) £159 600 per year, the migrant can leave the UK and apply for the Tier 2(General) and thus avoid the 12 months cooling period.

    Note that the para 245HD.( c ) prevents such a migrant from switching in-country. At the same time the para 245HB.( g )(ii) exempts such a migrant from the 12 month cooling period when applying for entry clearance from outside the UK.

    >>> Has your immigration application been outstanding for years and years ?

    If your immigration application has been outstanding (that is, awaiting a decision by the UK BA) for years, then you may be able at least able to put some pressure upon the UK BA by at least relying upon the case of the Secretary of State for the Home Department v Said [2018] EWCA Civ 627.
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  6. #156
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    09 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> Notes on the UK BA pre-Settled and Pre-Settled Status roll-out programme from the recent UK BA meeting – how will the Settled and Pre-Settled process look like

    “Roll out – the default position is that there is no personal checking of docs before applying. There is an app which allows you to take a scan of your passport. The app will read the passport’s biometric and pass the data to the UK BA. Other documents (eg evidence of residence) can be photographed or scanned by the applicant and emailed to the UK BA. Generally, only where there is something suspicious, or deficient, about a document, will a caseworker ask the applicant to submit an original by post.

    There will be a personal check of docs if the applicant chooses not to use the app – they can send passports to the UK BA to be checked and sent back, or attend a face to face appointment to have their document verified and given back. And of course the UK BA reserves the right to ask for identity documents to be submitted for manual checks even if the applicant has used the app (for example if the chip didn’t read properly).

    Applicants opened the web page by first choosing an EEA/other option. There is an option for a British citizen. It is assumed that choosing this option takes you to information for the British Citizen dual national citizens and the British Citizens and advises that you do not need to apply.

    First the applicant registers an email, receives an email to activate, continues with the application and creates an account.

    Roll out – simply does this more smoothly than was the case in the pilot.

    Provide name (title can be problematic – some passports include it with the name, some don’t).

    There is a male/female option.

    Roll out – non-binary option is under discussion but is unlikely to be included as it does not exist for other forms of ID.

    Option for entering relationships (family members don’t need to apply at the same time as the EEA national but it is generally advisable for the EEA national to enter them here).

    Drop down box for indicating nationality. This does not include ‘stateless’ (which may be relevant for a family member).

    Enter passport details or ID card details (see above re phone app which will auto populate all the personal data (name, DOB, nationality etc) included in the passport’s chip, as well as the passport details.)

    Option for ‘any other nationality?’

    Photo upload using webcam

    Roll out – using mobile camera or upload. There is no requirement for a formal passport photo.

    Confirm mobile number and address. Option to send correspondence elsewhere.

    Two questions: Do you have permanent residence documentation? And Do you have indefinite leave? Enter reference numbers.

    Roll out – these questions will be made clearer as they confuse those EEA nationals who have had nothing to do with any immigration controls. The person must have got evidence of Permanent Residence from the UK BA, not simply have acquired it.

    National Insurance Number – record is checked within one minute on upload of the application.

    Roll out – Some tax payments, and some benefits, are not proof of residence, so there will be work done to identify those in the NI records.

    Convictions of any kind – give details.

    Questions on war crimes/genocide etc. as per other application forms. Further info/definitions appear if you hover over the question.

    Website then asks for £65 payment if you have not answered ‘yes’ to ‘do you have documented PR/ILR?’
    Child fee is £32.50.

    Credit card payment – someone else can pay for you if you don’t have a card.

    Roll out – other options?

    After the payment page, a page tells the applicant whether they are being considered for Settled or pre-Settled status (see below for criteria, meaning etc).

    If you’re being considered for pre-settled status and you believe you should be considered for settled status you have the option to provide evidence to support this. If you choose to do so at this stage the next page will tell you which years of residence have a tick for residence accepted, and which do not. You can then upload or send documents to satisfy residence for those years where the NI record is insufficient, or provide evidence of residence for an en-tirely different period if that is easier (the NI look up defaults to searching for the most re-cent residence period). If you agree that you have not been resident for 5 years, then you just accept the pre-settled status. The UK BA wants to discourage discussion at this stage – if, for example, you get pre settled status, you can apply for free to upgrade to settled status, with evidence, at the point where you accumulate your 5 years’ residence. You don’t need to ar-gue about it or send any evidence about it at the initial stage. It’s meant to be simple – 5 years, or no 5 years?

    You get the page with the details of the proposed decision and a reference number sent to your email.

    If you want a copy of the information you have put on the application, you can download it.

    Roll out – you can download it to your device or have it emailed to you.

    That is it for the time being.

    What happens next?

    The application has to be checked by a human. At that stage the caseworker may call for any dubious documents to be sent in or ask for additional evidence, if required.

    The caseworker is not looking out for fraud in relation to benefits or tax. If the proof of resi-dence box is ticked, eg. because in that year some NI payments have been made, or some benefits have been paid out, the caseworker does not see the full detail of that (eg employer name, amount of tax, benefit type etc). If there are missing years then the person may need to upload additional evidence, and the caseworker will see that and consider whether it meets the evidence of residence requirement. As per the published guidance, the evidence submitted does not need to be evidence of employment or any ‘permitted activity.’
    The default position is that no documents are sent. The exceptions are where there are a very large number of pages which exceed the file upload limit (which they don’t envisage hap-pening as you don’t need much evidence for proving residence in any one year…..); or the caseworker calls for them – see para above.

    Obviously the UK BA can’t make a policy statement that they won’t ever refer information to DWP/HMRC to prosecute fraud, but they’re not searching for it at this stage. There is no duty on the HO to pass on discrepancies to other government agencies. The HO does not want to ‘disincentivise’ people from applying.
    There will be a security check run, as for all applicants for some form of immigration status. The caseworker will be interested in any discrepancies between security information and declarations on the application form and will ask for more information. The criteria for re-fusal are set out in the draft withdrawal agreement.

    The UK BA said that they are not interested in minor offences eg. Driving penalties. Full details have been published elsewhere.

    ship.”.[/b][/color]
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  7. #157
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    11 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> Children of unmarried British citizen or settled fathers guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...olicy-guidance

    >>> Complete visas and immigration operational guidance: https://www.gov.uk/topic/immigration...ional-guidance

    >>> Immigration tribunals lose their way in overcomplicated human rights rules: https://www.bailii.org/scot/cases/ScotCS/2018/[2018]_CSIH_65.html

    The appeal of Orhan Mendirez [2018] CSIH 65 is an interesting judgment from the Inner House in which both the Upper Tribunal and First-tier Tribunal come in for criticism. Both failed to approach their decision-making task, in an appeal focused on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, with the “anxious scrutiny required”.

    The decision illustrates two characteristics of our immigration law at present. Firstly, that the law is unnecessarily tortuous as regards the proper assessment of family life rights under Article 8. Secondly, that this complexity detracts from the tribunal’s primary function, which is to resolve matters of fact.
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  8. #158
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    12 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> UK Government Update: statement by Caroline Nokes MP on the Immigration Health Surcharge increase: https://www.parliament.uk/business/publicat...-10-11/HCWS995/

    The NHS surcharge fee will double. Students and those under the Youth Mobility Scheme will pay £300 (previously £150) per years, while anyone else will be paying £400 (previously £200) per year.

    These changes do not affect permanent residents, who are not required to pay the IHS. Certain vulnerable groups such as asylum seekers and modern slavery victims are exempt from paying the IHS. Short-term migrants (including those on visitor visas) and those without permission to be in the UK are generally charged for secondary care treatment by the NHS at the point of access.

    >>> UKVI Guidance: Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules: HC 1534: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/...11-october-2018

    The Government has laid out a statement of changes to the Immigration Rules, and an explanatory memorandum.

    >>> UKVI Guidance: EU Settlement Scheme pilot: applicant eligibility: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/eu-settlement-s...ntent=immediate

    A new phase of the EU Settlement Scheme pilot will open on 1 November 2018 and will run until 21 December 2018.
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  9. #159
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    12 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> UK Government Update: statement by Caroline Nokes MP on the Immigration Health Surcharge increase: https://www.parliament.uk/business/p...10-11/HCWS995/

    The NHS surcharge fee will double. Students and those under the Youth Mobility Scheme will pay £300 (previously £150) per years, while anyone else will be paying £400 (previously £200) per year.

    These changes do not affect permanent residents, who are not required to pay the IHS. Certain vulnerable groups such as asylum seekers and modern slavery victims are exempt from paying the IHS. Short-term migrants (including those on visitor visas) and those without permission to be in the UK are generally charged for secondary care treatment by the NHS at the point of access.

    >>> New service from the UK BA beginning in November 2018

    From the UK BA email:

    “From next month, UK Visas and Immigration is introducing new, streamlined services, allowing customers in the UK to submit all necessary evidence and personal information to support their application quickly and securely through a joined up journey.

    The new services will offer a range of benefits to customers, including:

    • A streamlined online journey for most application types, with an intuitive easy-to-use form making it easier to apply and the option to purchase additional services for convenience or speed;
    • A modernised, digital and more secure process to submit key evidence and personal information, with most customers able to retain their passports and other valuable evidence rather than sending them separately to UKVI;
    • Fast and convenient self service with the ability to make applications and upload evidence from home;
    • More flexible on-demand, mobile application services, for example at university campuses, employers’ offices or individual customers’ homes;
    • Enhanced support for vulnerable customers through a range of financial support for travel costs and mobile services.

    UK Visa and Citizenship Application Service

    The vast majority of customers will complete their applications via the UK Visa and Citizenship Application Service (UK VCAS), delivered by our commercial partner Sopra Steria. Appointments will be available for free in centres located in 6 major cities; with an additional 50 local user-pay service centres located in libraries; and a user-pay premium service point in central London.

    These centres will open around the country from 5th November to early December 2018. During this period, the majority of customers can choose whether to enrol their biometrics and submit their evidence via these new centres or use the existing processes, such as the Post Office.

    UKVI Service and Support Centres
    For other customers who may be in positions of vulnerability or need more face to face help with their application, free appointments will be offered in 7 dedicated Service and Support Centres (SSCs) from January 2019. This will enable experienced UKVI staff to better understand the customer’s circumstances, validate evidence, and take appropriate action to support them. These customers will continue to use the existing process until January.

    Application forms and GOV.UK

    Customers will be intuitively led through an online application process, making it clear what they need to do, what supporting evidence they should provide and where they need to go to complete their application.
    UKVI’s ambition is to offer a modern, world class customer service to all customers. As such, most visa and immigration services are now available online to customers in the UK via GOV.UK.

    Over the next few months the majority of paper forms will be withdrawn and most UK-based customers will need to apply via GOV.UK online.

    Support is available to help customers to complete their application online. The Assisted Digital Service aims to ensure that nobody is excluded from making an immigration application due to lack of digital skills or access to a computer. Eligible customers are offered telephone support, or face to face support at a library or their home, to help them access and complete the online form. This service does not provide immigration advice.

    We will be in touch later on this month with full details of when every site will open and the process to be followed.
    For any questions relating to these new services, please contact FrontEndServicesTeam@homeoffice.gov.uk Premium Sponsors should contact their licence manager.
    UKVI and Sopra Steria look forward to working with you to deliver an improved customer service and application process from next month.

    Regards,
    UK Visas and Immigration.”

    >>> UKVI Guidance: Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules: HC 1534: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...1-october-2018

    The Government has laid out a statement of changes to the Immigration Rules, and an explanatory memorandum.

    >>> UKVI Guidance: EU Settlement Scheme pilot: applicant eligibility: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/eu-settl...tent=immediate

    A new phase of the EU Settlement Scheme pilot will open on 1 November 2018 and will run until 21 December 2018.
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  10. #160
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    12 October 2018 – Just useful and just interesting UK & EEA Immigration Law news and updates from the Legal Centre – Open 7 days a week - www.legalcentre.org – Mob : +44(0)7791145923

    >>> New statement of changes to the Immigration Rules: HC 1534 – An in-depth review of the changes

    There is some very welcome news, including more flexibility given to caseworkers on whether and when they can write to applicants to ask for missing documents. (Whether they will in practice or still refuse for minor mistakes is another matter.) In addition, the Home Office will no longer insist on seeing original documents: copies may be provided. So far, all in line with the Secretary of State’s plan to “introduce an immigration system that allows staff greater freedom to use their common sense”.

    Except where otherwise indicated, these changes will come into force on 5 November, although the statement of changes does not specify whether it is for applications submitted after 5 November, or decided after 5 November.

    Making a valid application, fee waivers and passports

    Paragraph 34 of the Rules, which deals with valid and invalid immigration applications in the UK, is amended to reflect the introduction of a new in-country application process from next month. The bottom line is they are trying to go digital — see the explanatory memorandum here: https://assets.publishing.service.go...accessible.pdf - says “the ambition is that most applicants will apply online” — and most people will be able to keep their original documents. Accordingly:

    applicants will no longer need to submit passport-size photographs. This has probably been a redundant requirement for some time, given that applicants are already required to enrol their biometric information, which includes a photograph, as part of their application.
    • paper forms can only be used if submitting the application by post. Those who will want to use the Premium Service Centre, or its future equivalent – see https://www.gov.uk/government/news/s...-ukvi-contract - will need to apply online.

    If certain (minor) issues arise during the application process, then:

    • where an applicant has not submitted a “valid” application, the Secretary of State may give them an opportunity to rectify the mistake within a specified timescale. It used to be that they could only give 10 working days, but they now have discretion to give more time – or less – it still needs to be confirmed
    the Secretary of State now has discretion to consider an invalid application as valid, provided the specified fee was paid and proof of identity submitted (or, if not submitted, one of the exceptions to submit a proof of identity apply – see paragraph 34(5)). For example, if an applicant were to submit the wrong form, or submit an incomplete form, the Secretary of State could still consider the application as if it had been submitted on the right form.
    the Secretary of State will return an applicant’s ID while the application is outstanding, unless he “considers it necessary to retain it”. This is welcome news. Not having a passport can be problematic: it is needed to give notice of an intention to marry or sit the English language / Life in the UK tests. However, leaving the UK while an application is pending will still result in the application being treated as withdrawn
    • those who want to apply for a fee waiver can apply online. They will need to make the fee waiver application first. Once that has been considered and they have received a decision by the Home Office, they will then need to make the application for leave to remain within 10 days. As long as the application for leave to remain is made within those 10 days, the date of the application will be the date of the fee waiver, therefore protecting those who make fee waiver applications on time from becoming overstayers.

    These changes will take effect on 1 November, and will apply to applications made on or after that date.

    More flexibility and copies of documents


    Changes to part 6A of the Rules, relating to Point Based System migrants, also offer more flexibility. For example, officials can decide to:

    • request an applicant to submit specified evidence which they have left out entirely. As the Rules are currently drafted, they could only do so if “some of the documents within a sequence have been omitted (for example, if one page from a bank statement is missing) and the documents marking the beginning and end of that sequence have been provided”.
    • request more evidence as many times as they wish (the Rules currently specify that a request for documents will only be made once)
    • grant an application even if a specified document is omitted or submitted in the wrong format, if the missing information is verifiable from other documents provided in the application or elsewhere.


    Documents will not be requested when even if they were provided, the application would still fall to be refused.

    These are the good news for the applicants who are worried about having missed any one document in circumstances where it is clear from the rest of the application that the Rules are met. Of course, caseworkers are not obliged to request missing documents (the Rules say “may”, not “must”), but it is hoped discretion will be used whenever applications would otherwise clearly meet the rules.

    Another positive development is being able to submit copies of documents rather than originals. These changes are made throughout the Rules, where all references to “original” (as far as it can be seen now) were deleted and/or replaced with “copies”. This can save applicants money and administrative nightmares.

    The Legal Centre has been pioneering this approach for over a decade, long before the UK BA decided to “repeat” the firm’s experience. For example, the Legal Centre’s client and the sponsor (spouse) can simply upload their documents into a shared Dropbox folder, and the application can be printed out by either one to submit to the relevant body (the Visa Application Centre in the applicant’s country or Sheffield (for the Settlement applications in certain countries).

    EU Settlement Scheme


    Changes to the EU Settlement Scheme include:

    • changes to reflect the second trial phase of the scheme, which will run from 1 November to 21 December 2018. Details of who will be eligible to apply during this second phase are at pages three to six of the statement of changes and summarised here: https://homeofficemedia.blog.gov.uk/...cheme-phase-2/ They include staff in the higher education, health and social sectors across the UK, and “vulnerable individuals” supported by specific local authorities and community groups.
    • the introduction of a right to administrative review. This will be available to those whose settled status application is refused on the basis that they do not meet the eligibility requirement and those who are granted limited (pre-settled) rather than indefinite (settled) leave to remain. Those refused on the basis of suitability or those whose application is rejected as invalid will not have a right to administrative review. They are better than typical administrative reviews:

    o the application can be made from outside or inside the UK, and it will not be considered withdrawn if an applicant leaves the UK while the administrative review is pending
    o the deadline to apply is 28 days after receipt of the refusal (normally the deadline is 14 days for people applying from inside the UK, and 28 if they are applying from abroad)
    o the reviewer can take into consideration documents submitted in support of the administrative review which were not available to the decision-maker at the time of the decision (this can only be done in rare circumstances for other administrative reviews) and can even take themselves the initiative to request further documents to an applicant
    • amendments are made to align the rights of “Surinder Singh” family members to the family members of EU citizens.

    These changes come into place on 1 November.

    Other changes

    The list of subjects which require an Academic Technology Approval Scheme certificate is updated. The majority of the changes seem to reflect a technical change of name by the Higher Education Statistics Authority rather than a change in the subjects. These changes will take effect on 1 January 2019 for decisions made on or after that date.

    Appendix KOLL now specifies the evidence that applicants must provide if they want a medical exemption from the requirement to pass the English language or the Life in the UK tests. People must provide a copy of the form published on gov.uk for this purpose, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...ntal-condition - completed by a doctor who is either:

    a. the applicant’s GP or a GP based in the practice with which the applicant is normally registered; or
    b. a General Medical Council (GMC) registered consultant

    This doctor must have “met with the applicant in person, assessed their ability to fulfill the requirements set out in this appendix, and supports their request for an exception from either or both elements of KOLL on the basis that they have a condition which would prevent them from satisfying the requirements for the foreseeable future”.
    Помощь русскоговорящего адвоката высшей категории: консультации, проверка заявлений, ведение дел: www.legalcentre.org Mob/Viber/WhatsApp:+44(0)77 911 45 923

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